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Oct 25, 2020Liked by punk basketball

Can’t help myself...

Chicago Bulls: Olajuwon right that MJ is ‘far superior player’ to LeBron

Former Houston Rockets legendary center Hakeem Olajuwon had high marks for the Chicago Bulls all-time great Michael Jordan in the GOAT debate. The ongoing GOAT debate between the Chicago Bulls legendary shooting guard Michael Jordan and the Los Angeles Lakers superstar and reigning NBA Champion LeBron James got its latest contribution this week. The former Houston Rockets Hall-of-Fame center and 12-time NBA All-Star selection Hakeem Olajuwon gave his take on the GOAT debate between Jordan and

Read in FanSided : https://apple.news/Ahxyf4qR4OYWSPkfZ4Ihglg

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Just compare the Lakers, Celtics, Spurs, and Warriors rosters that LeBron had to compete against vs the Jazz team that was Jordan’s “rival” on his last two titles. Even the Lakers team Jordan’s Bull’s beat for their first title looked like the finals version of the Warriors last year after Klay got hurt. Jordan was great, and his branding built on the foundations of Bird and Magic to take the NBA to world wide Popularity, but this unanimous false idol silliness has got to find a balance at some point.

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I don’t get how there’s no NBA people from that era pointing out how Jordan’s Bulls played in a watered down post expansion league while LeBron had to play against all time great teams.

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Oct 25, 2020Liked by punk basketball

As someone who already feels overpaid sometimes while making a small fraction of what an NBA rookie makes, I'll withhold my opinions on how the millionaires union and billionaires consortium decide to split league revenue.

But the league being back with real games sounds wonderful, as long as it's done in a way that maintains the health and integrity of the sport. (Other leagues' experiences with COVID-19 are illustrative here.)

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The way I read this: The league is missing out on up to 40% of its profits from fans and therefore will withhold 40% of players salaries for the foreseeable future?

What happens to the escrow accounts if the league gets fans back at some point, or if the FL teams have full arenas?

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That Christmas day TV revenue is huge so it makes sense to want to shoot for that day. That kind of TV exposure leads to more $$ spent on NBA related things for Christmas, too.

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I thought by saying up to 40% was going to be put in escrow, it meant that at some point the players will eventually get that part of their salaries - but it may be a few years down the road before that happens, when the league is back to making the $$ it had been. But it would make more sense to do that for the upper echelon players than to make the players at the bottom of the pay scale have to give up that percentage, as well.

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At this point will it make a difference on Klays knee if we start in Dec vs Feb? I just remember there was an article floating around either here or GSOM about how 2 years away from putting basketball pressure on a surgically repaired knee ligament is most ideal vs the commonly accepted 12-16 months.

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I think I was just reading that when Klay was at the Dubble mini camp that it was already 16 months since the injury, not the surgery. So, a Dec 25th date adds 2 1/2 months to that. So at least 16 months since his surgery. I remember that he waited 2 or more weeks after the injury before having surgery.

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Oct 24, 2020Liked by punk basketball

I'd love to see NBA action soon. The bubble games were great. But the inability to hold arena games and the resulting lost revenue needs to be borne by both players and owners. The highest paid players should take the biggest cuts - not because people are tuning in to watch some league minimum no-name to loft up uncountable 3's - but because the overweight on their salaries when revenue is high is more evident when revenue is low.

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I think the owners should take the biggest share of the losses. They’ve reaped the rewards of increasing franchise values without sharing those profits. And well run businesses should be prepared to keep their key employees well compensated during tough times. I’d consider fair somewhere between players taking 20-30% less for the moment. Free agents are already going to get hammered. Adding the escrow on top of it is too slanted.

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The NBA union has a tendency to attach their biggest OGs to the labor negotiation teams, so they've tended to be a little top-heavy in their priorities. Remember that last time they locked out there was all sorts of noise about giving players more control of where they played, but a lot of that got dropped for a larger share of BRI, and the modification of max contracts for old players (like LeBron and CP3) by pushing back the age limit contractual structures.

I get that this is a weird time, but I really hope the NBA's return isn't contingent on the players giving back a ton of their share of the revenue split.

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